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Eric: Because a year seems long enough, don't you think?

Observant people will notice a change in the sidebar, because people tend to be observant even when you don't expect them to be. But, rather than tease you about it, I'll just say it right out.

The "You Had Me, And You Lost Me" section had three entries yesterday. It has only one today.

We should probably talk about that.

The essays all still exist, of course. If you click on the category link for "You Had Me, And You Lost Me," you'll see all of them. However, both the Megatokyo and the It's Walky essays were posted over a year ago. It's Walky ended in that time. And it's been a year since I've done more than glance at Megatokyo.

Some time ago, someone wrote to me and suggested that leaving the essays -- as popular as they are -- on the front page was uncharacteristically mean spirited, despite the fact that the essays themselves are not meant to be mean. And that person had a point, and we discussed it a little at the time. And at the time I decided to leave them up, because I felt they said something important about me and about the site.

That hasn't changed. But something else has: time has passed.

I still get comments on the Megatokyo essay. And I still get e-mail. People who agree with me. People who disagree with me. And every so often I make a reference to that essay. But when I make references to it, I have to caveat them. "I don't actually read Megatokyo. These things might have improved. I don't know. This should not be considered supplemental criticism."

And it occured to me that at some point, you can't very well have people reading your essay, linked from your home page, and reacting to it like it's current. You have to let these things sink into the historical record, and from there into their historical perspective. (For some value of "history" that applies to "a blog" and "one year.")

So, I discussed it with Wednesday, and she concurred. From this point forward, You Had Me, And You Lost Me lasts one year. For that year, the essay remains on the home page, and neither Wednesday nor I will make current critical comments about it.

At the end of that year, while the essay will remain on the site, it will go off the front page and specific prohibition will expire. Which means that Megatokyo and It's Walky (not that It's Walky hasn't been subsumed by Joyce and Walky anyhow) are legal. General Protection Fault will expire, similarly, on 16-November-2005. (In a practical sense, that means it'll have one or two weeks less time on the front page than the others, since both of them expired at the end of August/beginning of September, but I don't think anyone will care.)

If some more current essay doesn't appear between now and mid-November, the sidebar entry for "You Had Me, And You Lost Me" will disappear. But I'm making no promises -- "Oceans Unmoving II" has launched, after all.

Now, does this mean I'm going to unleash pent up fury at Megatokyo now that there's no direct prohibition? Does this mean that on 17-November I'm going to start an eight part series on GPF?

Well, no.

See, the thing is... I don't read those strips any more. That's actually the whole point of "You Had Me, And You Lost Me." The reason to put one of those essays up in the first place is to discuss the reasons why a strip I used to love isn't so loved any more. They are cautionary tales. And afterward? I walk away. I'm not going to rule out picking up the Megatokyo trade paperbacks and reading them. And I'll always leave the possibility of being "re-had" by something. (I won't pretend I haven't looked at the sites that went on the list in the past year.)

And, more to the point... Wednesday still reads GPF. And I believe she reads Megatokyo too. And I read both Shortpacked and Joyce and Walky. The fact that something's off my list doesn't mean it's off hers.

I had someone ask if Wednesday could write a "You Had Me, And You Lost Me" essay. The answer is "of course." And if she did, it'd go up on the sidebar for a year and I wouldn't discuss it for a year. But it just seems to me that it's not fair to the strips in question to leave the front page links up more than a year after the essayist stopped reading, and it's not fair to the other writer on this site to tie their hands for more than a year on subjects that mean a lot to them.

So. Anyway.

Posted by Eric Burns-White at September 23, 2005 12:10 PM

Comments

Comment from: Daven posted at September 23, 2005 12:27 PM

That seems reasonable. Well done.

Can't wait for Wednesday's first YHM,TLM essay. Should be interesting.

FIRST!!!

Comment from: 32_footsteps posted at September 23, 2005 12:39 PM

Well, it's kind of difficult to say that they're in the past, though. Well, you can certainly say that with It's Walky, seeing as it has ended and its two sequel comics are different beasts entirely.

With GPF and MT, though, you can quite clearly point to where those problems still surface. For Megatokyo, you can see signs of improvement, but if anything today's comic shows that Gallagher still backslides on occasion (that comic could have been done in three panels, four if you didn't want them to get too crowded). I'm still quite the MT fan (as you know from my comments), but we're still some ways before I'd ask you to give the site another chance.

General Protection Fault, however... Darlington is promising (threatening?) another year-long arc along the lines of Surreptitious Machinations. I swear I have a mental image of Nick holding the Sword of Damocles. If anything, I'm half-expecting Wednesday's first "You Had Me..." piece to carry the subtitle, "Why I don't read GPF either."

Even given that one of my favorite webcomics is on your list, I think they should stay front and center until the artists prove, somehow, that they don't belong there anymore (given that It's Walky ended, I think that should be a suitable reason).

Comment from: Eric Burns posted at September 23, 2005 12:43 PM

First off -- I think Daven is the first person to ever do a "First Post" bit down here. Go fig!

Secondly -- you may well be right, 32. At the same time? I don't know that to be true. The only way I would know that to be true is to start reading again -- and if I do that, the category's a lie anyway.

Comment from: 32_footsteps posted at September 23, 2005 12:56 PM

I might be misremembering, but I'm fairly certain others have done the "first post" thing before.

While it might be true that things have changed in the comics, it doesn't lessen the importance of those essays. Like you said, they're more than just a final note of dissatisfaction with a given strip. They're cautionary tales. And they lose their impact if they're hidden away.

Now, don't get me wrong, I'll be one of the first commenters should someone snark MT. But I think it's fair if they stay there. Really, part of why the comics got there in the first place is because they were unfair to you as a reader. If anything, keeping them there is the fair option.

Comment from: John posted at September 23, 2005 12:59 PM

Ah, but what if Weds wanted to do a "Had me and lost me" on Narbonic? Could you really go a whole year without commenting on Garrity's work?

You might want to think twice about that policy, Eric. ;)

And IMO Megatokyo is still the best webcomic out there today, for all its flaws. But to each his own.

Comment from: Johnny Assay posted at September 23, 2005 1:02 PM

But what about Garfield?

Comment from: TheNintenGenius posted at September 23, 2005 1:19 PM

On one hand, this is a fairly reasonable ida. But on the other, I think that your "You Had Me and You Lost Me" features are some of the best on the site, and to be honest, I think you probably attracted quite a few readers with those essays (myself included).

Comment from: Tangent posted at September 23, 2005 1:31 PM

You're threatening a You Had Me And You Lost Me for Sluggy Freelance? OO;;

Holy freaking Cthulhu...

You *should* put up the YHMAYLM for Garfield though. It was fuuun! :D

Take care, Eric.

Robert A. Howard, Tangents Webcomic Reviews
http://www.tangents.us

Comment from: Daven posted at September 23, 2005 1:32 PM

Well, I tend to get all fanboyish at times. Go fig. LOL

Just read all the YHMTLM snarks with the exception of the one which closed.

I have to say that they are harsh, but necessary. If anyone who is thinking about doing a webcomic would read those, they could get a heck of an education on what NOT to do, then I say leave them up.

I've seen the Different Strokes syndrome, the First and Ten syndrome, the Cerberus syndrome and so on with other things than webcomics, most notibly print comics like X-Men and some of the games I have played in when I was still an RPG player. I've seen it in print mediums too, like Stephen King (which I think is a whole syndrome in and of itself, defined as writing for word count and not plot advancment).

The snarks SHOULD stay, and I relize that my saying this is like saying the Government should tax us, it's gonna be done anyhow.

If it were me, I would suggest that the heading of the essay links be linked to that category, simply to facilitate getting to them. I know it's linked in one other place, but it took me a while to find that link and it wasn't intuitive. Just a suggestion.

If for no other reason than teaching others what NOT to do, the essays should stay up. "Remember kids, your purpose in life may be to serve as a bad example."

Comment from: Darth Paradox posted at September 23, 2005 1:33 PM

Why not have separate YHM,YLM sections for each writer? As you said, one person's dropping the comic from one's personal trawl - and, of course, writing an essay on why - shouldn't require the other person to refrain from commenting on the strip - even for a year; a year is a long time. (I realized this when I thought back to when I first read the essays in question, and how much has changed since then. Gah.)

Comment from: quiller posted at September 23, 2005 1:56 PM

I have to think that if Wednesday still reads Chick Tracts, most webcomics will be safe from YHMAYLM essays from her. ON the other hand, it has just now struck me as wrong to say that anything is safe from Wednesday! Quake in fear, tiny mortals!

Comment from: Kristofer Straub posted at September 23, 2005 2:12 PM

Get ready for You Had Me, You Lost Me, You Found Me, You Lost Me Again After The Fifth Year, I Found Something Else For Four Months, And Then You Really Lost Me For Good That Last Time.

Comment from: siwangmu posted at September 23, 2005 2:23 PM

Which we will naturally refer to as YHMYLMYFMYLMAATFYIFSEFFMATYRLMFGTLT.

For simplicity's sake!

(I'm sorry, I had to!)

Comment from: 32_footsteps posted at September 23, 2005 2:47 PM

To be fair, if Oceans Unmoving II plays out like the first did, or worse, then Sluggy will deserve it.

Daven, writers have been using the phrase "Charles Dickens syndrome" to describe writing for word count since before I was born (at least, I've read references to it that were older than me). Stephen King is just the obvious recent example of the problem.

As for the one on Garfield, leave that one off. Of course, I was the one who said it wasn't nearly as funny as everyone else seemed to think it was. Too over the top and not subversive enough.

Comment from: siwangmu posted at September 23, 2005 2:49 PM

Also, on the actual subject: Eric, I think it's fair to assume that while they've faded into the background for someone like me who comes here semi-religiously, the hadmelostme snarks are a big part of the site's history in the way where you would want them to be kind of clearly accessible to people. Obviously there's a hadmelostme link in the nicely organized list of category links on the right, but what if, in the real estate that is currently a list of hadmelostme's (or was a list, now kind of one), the title thingy itself linked to the overall list/conglomerated page? Then you'd have a clear and accessible link to the hadmelostme archive as well as the list of specifically not-expired ones linking directly from the front page. Yes, it would replicate the function of the link to hadmelostme (I find this easier to type) in the category list, but it could be argued that that was replicated just as much by the old way, with all the direct links on front. These were clearly considered significant enough to get their own section of the sidebar, and I would say they still are, as a group. So, in order to do the distance-y thing, you could either leave up or take down links to more recent hadmelostme's, and edit into the top of the others some kind of "Outdated" diclaimer (because a vague disclaimer is nobody's friend), but at any rate there'd still be a "this is probably important and there is some chance you are coming here specifically to find it so here is a separate and obvious link on the main page" thing. (Do people still come here for those? I guess that's part of the whole issue, but they do seem to still get mentioned).

So, uh, my approximately 1/6th of a bit.

Comment from: Wednesday posted at September 23, 2005 4:35 PM

A few things:

I have to think that if Wednesday still reads Chick Tracts, most webcomics will be safe from YHMAYLM essays from her.

Well, the thing is, Chick still works with Fred Carter. A fair chunk of the post-movie output has been going through him, including both of the current continuity lines, and those are still batshit addictive. I'm less and less enthused by Chick's solo work, but these things come out like every two months -- it's hardly a commitment.

And it's worth keeping an eye on Chick's experiments with continuity, too. The whole serial tract model isn't really something we've seen a lot of in the field. It would seem to run counter to the backbone of Chick's whole distribution model, which frequently relies on anonymity or casual encounters rather than relationship upkeep. I keep saying this, because I'm not sure people really believe me: many involved with secular comics could do worse than to study Chick's viral influence as closely as possible.

(Hey, I wasn't smart enough to go to college. This is what you get instead.)

Anyways. No, you're probably not safe, because:

You're threatening a You Had Me And You Lost Me for Sluggy Freelance? OO;;

Christ, I'm prepared to go back and catch up on the eighteen months of Sluggy I've been making a point of not reading just so that I could get lost AGAIN and write this myself, if I have to. If it'll give us a year where we just don't have to think about bloody Sluggy, I'm all for it. The day I realized I didn't have to read this dreck anymore if I didn't want to, I smiled like a woman who does not suck and does not have depression. It didn't even get me on trainwreck appeal. And I have a lot of room in my heart for trainwreck appeal.

But, you know, Eric seemed to like it, so I was all quiet and sweet and Not Talking About It and everything...

Comment from: 32_footsteps posted at September 23, 2005 4:57 PM

I'm always amused by seeing people say stuff like, "when I realized I didn't have to read it anymore..." Do people forget this obvious point often?

The funny thing is, part of me always wanted to see Eric write a "You Had Me..." essay on a webcomic that nearly made me write a similar essay. However, my reaction to that comic was of revulsion well beyond Eric at his most virulent. I wouldn't want to put him through that (besides which, Eric has heavily suggested before that he wasn't fond of said artist, so Eric wasn't ever had in the first place).

Even if it means no more Sluggy for a year (and even if Sluggy suddenly had its greatest year ever), I'd love to see this rant from Wednesday.

Comment from: Shaenon posted at September 23, 2005 5:31 PM

Right, Wednesday. Like you could ever stop reading GPF.

You want to know the mystery of Sam! You know you do!

Comment from: Alan Sharkey posted at September 23, 2005 6:00 PM

Yes, the You Had Me And You Lost Me essays are harsh. They need to be. They deserve to be. The whole point of them is that the are written from the point of view of someone who has read a comic, stuck by it, and eventually become so disillusioned by it that they just couldn't go back to it. They are of the moment, a breaking point, in which you just cannot take it any more, and have just given up on something you have had great affection for.

The thing about the YHMAYLM, though, which makes them great as criticism, is although they're personal, they're not bitter. They are harsh, they are tough, but they are fair. That they are negative to the extent that they are, as opposed to the vast amounts of positivity that radiates from much of Eric's snarks (and don't get me wrong, the positivity is great, introduces me to things that I've never thought I would be interested in (read: comic book superheroes), and is a refreshing change from a lot of the sniping, the sneering, and other things that I've seen on a few other websites where things are discussed critically) does provide a counterbalance of sorts, of Eric setting forth what drew him into the comic, what made him quantify why he still read it, and why, finally, it was really too much to go on following which gave such little enjoyment in return.

The sheer scarcity of the YHMAYLM essays is another factor. I've always found Eric a remarkably tolerant critic, able to justify certain troughs, or certain faults, in an appraisal of the whole. I mean, how many terrible reviews or criticism do most critical sites dole out,and leave up for viewing? Does this mean they are mean spirited? Does this mean that they are just trying to stir up trouble? Not really, I don't think that they do. For that to reflect on Eric, then, is absurd. Perhaps it is their scarcity, ironically, that have meant people single them out as "mean-spirited". That there have been so few show, in my opinion, not mean-spiritedness but the accomodating and tolerant nature of Eric's criticism, his joy of the positive aspect, his sheer enthusiasm at writing and webcomics that permeate Websnark, that make it infectious (for me, at least). And, after all, if they do "get" you again, you can always remove them. It's not as if they're set in stone.

For these reasons, and more, YHMAYLM should stay. Disillusionment is a terrible feeling. It also produces great writing.

Comment from: wedge posted at September 23, 2005 6:27 PM

Christ, I'm prepared to go back and catch up on the eighteen months of Sluggy I've been making a point of not reading just so that I could get lost AGAIN and write this myself, if I have to.

DOOO EEEEEEET.

You have to do it in one sitting, though. With a bottle of your intoxicant of choice. That might come close to filling in all of the missed days, Sunday comics out of sync, and little notes correcting confusing panels that you've missed by reading in real time.

Then you have to write it before you allow yourself to slip into unconsciousness, HST style. Fear & Loathing in the Dimension of Pain. It'll be glorious.

Comment from: Zeke posted at September 23, 2005 6:43 PM

Very, very, very good move, Eric. To use myself as an example, I like Websnark, but the whole idea of YHM&YLM just pisses me off -- and every time I come here, that sidebar is there making a big point of it. It's your prerogative to run any feature you want, but calling less attention to one this inflammatory is smart all round. After all, the people who like it won't care.

Peter David should take a page from your book. I for one would visit his blog more often if I didn't have to look at that stupid "Freedom Clock" every time.

Comment from: Alan Sharkey posted at September 23, 2005 7:16 PM

I don't see anything inflammatory about someone saying "Here's detailed reasons why something just doesn't thrill me like it used to." It's criticism. I don't see anything wrong with it. It's partisan, it's divisive, it's opinionated. Good, I say, for the reasons mentioned above. For what it's worth, I've only ever seen a YHMAYLM inspire debate upon the comic in question rather than it descending into anything less than what we usually get on Websnark. I just think people are getting into a tizzy over nothing.

On a different note, the Freedom Clock annoys me, and I'm so leftie, Kucinich would be screaming at me in horror and revulsion. It's childish, especially when there's far more trenchant points to make about both American and global politics.

Comment from: Wednesday posted at September 23, 2005 7:29 PM

wedge: You have to do it in one sitting, though. With a bottle of your intoxicant of choice.

So, concentrated Broken Saints, then.

I might die, you know. That was pretty strenuous the first time.

Comment from: Eric Burns posted at September 23, 2005 7:34 PM

Not to rain on this parade... but did Sluggy ever have you, Weds?

Comment from: SeanH posted at September 23, 2005 7:35 PM

I've seen the Different Strokes syndrome, the First and Ten syndrome, the Cerberus syndrome and so on with other things than webcomics, most notibly print comics like X-Men and some of the games I have played in when I was still an RPG player.

Okay, I've completely forgotten what Different Strokes Syndrome is. Can somebody tell me? Or Eric could update the Lexicon. Right after he finishes the 2004 Shortbreads :P

Comment from: Eric Burns posted at September 23, 2005 7:39 PM

Diff'rent Strokes and Webster Syndromes are hallmarks of a very special You Had Me And You Lost Me, Sean.

Comment from: wedge posted at September 23, 2005 7:40 PM

Mmm, dying is bad. I admit my enthusiasm was more in the abstract. Vote for self-destruction withdrawn. :)

Comment from: Wednesday posted at September 23, 2005 10:15 PM

Actually, yes, Eric. I quite enjoyed Sluggy for a few years.

Of course, if you're asking me a completely different question, that's between me and the Latin speaker.

Comment from: Wednesday posted at September 23, 2005 10:15 PM

And wedge: I'm happy to try the project spread out over a few livers. :)

Comment from: William_G posted at September 23, 2005 11:44 PM

wedge: You have to do it in one sitting, though. With a bottle of your intoxicant of choice.

Weds: So, concentrated Broken Saints, then.

I might die, you know. That was pretty strenuous the first time.

I remember watching Wednesday's slow deterioration in the Examiner forum as she told us about her harrowing experiences trying to make it all of the way through Broken Saints. At some points it seemed like we'd all have to get on a plane and rescue her from the DVD, but she persevered, and was able to write the review that would launch a thousad fanboys into a frenzy.

In a way, she became a broken saint herself.

Comment from: nonanonymous posted at September 24, 2005 3:02 AM

Am I the only one who didn't read most of those essays, simply by virtue of what they were?

I read through the Megatokyo one, but having not read GPF or It's Walky, I simply thought that most the content would be lost on me.

If the comic was one that had 'lost' our Eric, I felt it senseless to encumber myself by reading it through curiousity.

Maybe I'll read them now... (the articles, I mean).

Comment from: nonanonymous posted at September 24, 2005 3:50 AM

And now I'm just wondering why I didn't read them before. Awesome. Though I wasn't familiar with the material beforehand, I really felt close enough by the end to empathise.

Specially with GPF.

But now I'm feeling sad, as if I've been to a weepy film.

Comment from: Archon Divinus posted at September 24, 2005 4:04 AM

I have to say, I never really understood the hate for Oceans Unmoving. I enjoyed it. The only thing with OU2 is that I'd rather have something about Torg, that isn't Torgy Potter.
As for the YHMYLM, the Megatokyo one is responsible for my reading of Websnark. I came here from a PVP link, saw, read, and disagreed with the MT YHMYLM, and then kept coming back to Websnark because I liked the writing.

Comment from: Archon Divinus posted at September 24, 2005 4:16 AM

Oh, and as for the current state of MT, the updates are consisitent, but if you didn't like it before, you aren't going to change your mind.

Comment from: dreamshade posted at September 24, 2005 6:17 AM

Webcomic metadrama between authors can begin, develop, and end in the course of a weekend. But the webcomics themselves change only once every couple of years. I sense a paradox of time.

Comment from: Sage posted at September 24, 2005 10:11 AM

I had the same experience as Archon Divinus. The link from PVP brought me here. The article on Megatokyo ensured I would come back. Easily one of your best. Some of us enjoy a little vitriol now and again, and in the case of Megatokyo, it was definitely deserved. But I can't fault your reasoning. As long as we can still get to the articles...

Comment from: Paul Gadzikowski posted at September 24, 2005 11:22 AM

I'm always amused by seeing people say stuff like, "when I realized I didn't have to read it anymore..." Do people forget this obvious point often?

It's inertia. There's something on my current reading list on my front page that I once started the archives of and failed to finish. Then I added it to my reading list after I adopted a policy of not requiring myself to read archives before I add to my reading list. Some of the things whose archives lost me are now solid on my reading list but this one - even though it's highly popular and muchly informs the style of one whose archives didn't lose me - keeps making me think, "I dont' have to keep reading this" ... but as long as the link's there I keep clicking, and I probably won't remove the link until I next want to add something new.

The thing about the YHMAYLM ... is [that they're] a refreshing change from a lot of the sniping, the sneering, and other things that I've seen on a few other websites where things are discussed critically) does provide a counterbalance of sorts

I like to say that most negative web criticism consists of writing that treats its subject as dismissively and wordily as possible.

Comment from: Aerin posted at September 24, 2005 10:59 PM

Oh, and as for the current state of MT, the updates are consisitent, but if you didn't like it before, you aren't going to change your mind.

It should be said, though, that the links for cast and story pages both still point to pages that say only "(i'll finish this when i feel like it)". That's enough to keep me from taking a look at it, even out of curiosity.

Comment from: Matt Sweeney posted at September 25, 2005 12:08 AM

Oh, and as for the current state of MT, the updates are consisitent, but if you didn't like it before, you aren't going to change your mind.
They're consistent, if by consistent you mean there will consistently be a couple of blown off strips when ever he goes to a con, or when ever a new chapter is starting, or other assorted things happen. Now, he is doing A LOT better then he was, but he still misses a couple dozen deadlines a year.

Personally, I think it is a combination of him and Sarah taking on to much themselves (why, for the love of god, is he personally redesigning his site?) and poor management due to inexperience.

I think what Fred needs most is to hire a management consultant to come in, assess the situation, and tell him how to clean up his act. Even if it is just setting realistic goals. For instance, if every time you go to a con you end up missing two or three strips, may be you shouldn't try to do three strips when you go to cons? (and by strips, I'm including DPDs) And, while I apprecaite the sentiment of the filler strips between chapters, considering how every chapter gets off to a bumpy start while Fred tweeks the scripts, may be he should just take a week or two off and focus on the scripts. These are the kinds of things that a management consultant would tell him, and I think he and Sarah care enough about the project and their fans that they'd listen to the advice.

I also think he needs to go talk to a local university about getting an intern to pick up some of the slack. Even if it's just things like writing copy for the infamous cast and story pages.

Ok, I feel better now that I have that off my chest.

Comment from: Jin Wicked posted at September 25, 2005 8:55 PM

MT? Consistent? What are you smoking?

I've got the first two books, the first one I really like. Personally, I'm not buying any more because the story seems to be falling apart, and has gotten incredibly confusing, with too many chars and too many convoluted backstories that go or come from nowhere... that's really neither here nor there. But consistent? That comic is probably the most inconsistent one I know of (that I've ever read myself anyway) besides maybe MacHall. Of course, MacHall doesn't profess to have a schedule. There's nothing wrong with sporadic updates as long as you're straightforward about it. Which he is, I guess, with the status bar, and I'm not ripping on him but the "defenders" here. I wouldn't call it consistent by any stretch of the imagination.

Sometimes I think Fred has worse luck than me. Recently there wasn't a comic one day because his laptop exploded or something. Quite often it's because of cons. Then travel. Then his server down. Or his store code getting messed up. Or having to deal with merchandise. Then sick. DPDs and SGDs and "omake" whatever that is. And all of this I can recall in the last few weeks. I think he suffers mostly from poor self-management, poor planning, and like above, he and Sarah biting off more than they can chew. I think the suggestion to get a management consultant is a good one.

I mean Hell, one of the reasons I don't print my own books or stock my own merch is because I know it's too much for me to handle by myself, on top of everything else. You need to know your limits, because you really accomlish nothing when you consistently over-extend yourself.

Comment from: Archon Divinus posted at September 25, 2005 9:13 PM

He's more consistent then he used to be, and when his laptop exploded, he still managed to put out comics on time for a week, despite having lost all his scripts and notes. He still misses updates, and his insistance on doing everything himself causes problems, but it's still a signifacant improvement over last year.

Comment from: Jin Wicked posted at September 25, 2005 9:36 PM

Sorry... didn't mean that to come across as so snarky. I'm still kind of cranky from being holed up for over two days and unpacking. =(

Comment from: Archon Divinus posted at September 25, 2005 10:47 PM

And I'm sorry for sounding so defensive.

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